Rena's Promise: A Story of Sisters in Auschwitz by Rena Kornreich Gelissen, Heather Dune Macadam

By Rena Kornreich Gelissen, Heather Dune Macadam

A new, improved variation of Rena's Promise went on sale March 17, 2015. locate it indexed within the different variations of this name, or seek through ISBN: 978-080709313-9.

Sent to Auschwitz at the first Jewish delivery, Rena Kornreich survived the Nazi loss of life camps for over 3 years. whereas there she was once reunited together with her sister Danka. on a daily basis grew to become a fight to meet the promise Rena made to her mom while the relations used to be pressured to separate apart--a promise to maintain her sister.

One of the few Holocaust memoirs concerning the lives of girls within the camps, Rena's Promise is a compelling tale of the fleeting human connections that fostered selection and made survival plausible. From the bonds among moms, daughters, and sisters, to the hyperlinks among prisoners, or even prisoners and guards, Rena's Promise reminds us of the humanity and desire that survives inordinate inhumanity.

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Rena's Promise: A Story of Sisters in Auschwitz

A brand new, accelerated variation of Rena's Promise went on sale March 17, 2015. locate it indexed within the different variations of this name, or seek through ISBN: 978-080709313-9.

Sent to Auschwitz at the first Jewish delivery, Rena Kornreich survived the Nazi demise camps for over 3 years. whereas there she was once reunited together with her sister Danka. every day grew to become a fight to meet the promise Rena made to her mom whilst the relations was once compelled to separate apart--a promise to maintain her sister.

One of the few Holocaust memoirs concerning the lives of ladies within the camps, Rena's Promise is a compelling tale of the fleeting human connections that fostered choice and made survival achievable. From the bonds among moms, daughters, and sisters, to the hyperlinks among prisoners, or even prisoners and guards, Rena's Promise reminds us of the humanity and wish that survives inordinate inhumanity.

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2 J ews an d Po les i n Da˛b r owa Ta r n o ws ka b e fo r e 19 3 9 Seen through the lens of its ethnic composition, there was little to distinguish Dąbrowa Tarnowska County from other rural areas of Poland. Shortly before the war, local Jews made up 8 percent of the total population, or slightly less than the national average of 10 percent. The majority of Jews in the county lived in Dąbrowa, but nearly two thousand others dwelled in nearby villages, and their lifestyle differed little from that of the Polish peasants.

The last remaining Jews—some thirty Jewish policemen and their families—remained locked up in one of the ghetto houses. They, too, were shot at the Jewish cemetery (on December 20, 1942) by Rudolf Landgraf and his gendarmes. Even Kalman Fenichel, the much hated chief of Jewish police, was unable to save his own life, and was executed, along with his ten-year-old son and the rest of his subordinates. 13 Stanisław Dorosz from Dąbrowa—possibly the only witness to this execution—watched the shooting hidden in a shed, some forty meters away from the place of the killings: “They [the gendarmes] marched them out of the house four by four, and led them to the Jewish cemetery.

36 Hunt for the Jews Licht and Hollender died on Kościuszko Street, others died too, but I do not recall their names. In the spring, probably in May 1942, early in the morning, the city had been surrounded by Germans, who started to pull the Jews out of their houses, and to march them toward the main square. I could hear shots being fired. From behind the window, I could see Germans in uniforms. I have no idea whether there were local gendarmes. In front of my window I could see the body of a dead Jew and a Jewess, who was still moving.

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