Blue jackets of 1812 : a history of the naval battles of the by Willis J Abbot; H W McVickar; W C Jackson; Dodd, Mead &

By Willis J Abbot; H W McVickar; W C Jackson; Dodd, Mead & Company.; Burr Printing House

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Earlier than the appearance of radar and different digital units aboard warships, the roles of searching out the enemy and recognizing naval gunfire fell to the floatplane scouts. those small 1- and 2-seat catapult-launched airplane served aboard US army ships because the eyes of the fleet until eventually mid-1949. so much battleships carried as much as four floatplanes; cruisers with plane hangars may accommodate as many as eight airplane; destroyers, whilst appropriate, have been constrained to just 1 floatplane.

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4 shows the age-specific fertility rates outside marriage, a direct measure of the propensity to have a birth outside marriage relative to the ‘population at risk’. After the World War II ‘spike’, these non-marital fertility rates did not return to their 1938 levels, and from the mid-1950s they increased dramatically for all age groups, peaking in 1964 (for those aged 20–34) and then declining until the mid-1970s. 5 indicates, marital fertility rates showed a similar ‘baby boom and bust’ pattern, but rose and fell proportionately less around their much higher levels.

Since abortions are available from the NHS, it appears likely the statistics include virtually all induced abortions. 6). The residual in each case is conceptions terminated by abortion. Until the mid-1970s, a growing proportion of premarital conceptions in each five-year age group were terminated, after which time these proportions have been relatively constant. This type of model was discussed by Schelling (1978), and more recently by Manski (1993) and Durlauf and Young (2001). Formally, the model can be written as P = H[␣ + ␤Pe + zЈ␩], where P is the probability that a women becomes a single mother, Pe is the expected proportion becoming a single mother in that person’s ‘reference group’, z denotes a vector of individual attributes, H[·] is a specified continuous, strictly increasing distribution function, such as the logistic distribution, and ␣, ␤ and ␩ are parameters.

First consider the period 1938–64. 6 shows the large declines in the proportion of women not married among women aged 20–34. 4% in 1964, if the proportions married in each age group had remained at their 1938 values while the age structure and fertility rates of unmarried and married women changed as they actually did. Thus, large rises between 1938 and 1964 in the age-specific proportions of women married is mainly responsible for the moderate increase in bom in the face of the large increase in non-marital fertility rates (fomtj).

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